Pedagogy

All of our language courses are mapped onto the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) and use level specific course books as the basis of our syllabus. In each course there are learning aims that students can refer to so they have awareness of and become responsible for, their own learning and progress. Each level takes approx. 180 hours study although students may join or leave a level at any time that they are ready to.  We welcome your contributions and reflections so please let us know your thoughts either by talking to your teacher or Academic Manager or email us on info@galwaylanguage.com.

Beginner Syllabus - A1 – Learner Aims

I can exchange greetings (i.e., say hello and goodbye), introduce myself to other people.

I can count to 20.

I can say where I am from, and ask others where they are from.

I can name common countries and nationalities.

I can check in at a hotel

I can say the alphabet in English to spell my first name and surname, to give my email address, and can ask someone how to spell a word.

I can say numbers in English to tell people my age or to give my phone number.

I can name common classroom objects that I use every day, and ask what something is if I don’t know the word in English.

I can ask people to repeat information when they talk too quickly or when I don’t understand.

I can name small things in my bag using singular and plural nouns.

I can recognise different and vowel sounds.

I can talk about my family and ask other people simple questions about their family.

I can describe my car using common adjectives.

I can count from 21 – 100 and say my phone number

I can introduce somebody

I can ask how somebody is

I can ask for and give personal information, such as my address, name, number, age, etc.

I can say what I had for breakfast

I can say what food people eat in my country

I can talk about jobs and places of work

I can ask and say what time it is

I can say the days of the week

I can say what I do on a typical day and ask others about their typical day.

I can talk about activities I do in my free time and give details about how often I do them.

I can say what people can and can’t do in my country

I can say and understand prices, and I can ask how much something costs.

I can order a coffee in a café.

I can talk simply about what I did in the past and ask what other people did in the past.

I can understand the main points of a student blog

I can write a short report about what I did last Sunday

I can talk about the location of things using basic prepositions of place.

I can talk about where I was yesterday

I can understand and say the months and the date.

I can identify things in a hotel room

I can ask about the facilities in a hotel

I can say what there is in my town

I can describe what my town was like in the past

I can give my own opinion about people and things

I can talk about my predictions for the future.

I can read a simple article about someone’s holiday

I can write simple article about a personal holiday

I can use object pronouns in place of the object of the verb or after prepositions

I can talk about activities I like doing and that I don’t like doing

I can say three things I would like to do.

I can understand a short article about free time activities

I can talk about places I am going to visit

I can use prepositions of place

I can talk about the weather

I can give and understand simple directions

I can make predictions about the future

I can talk, and ask people about, future plans

Elementary Syllabus - A1 - Learner Aims

I can exchange greetings (i.e., say hello and goodbye), introduce myself to other people, and ask who they are.

I can say the days of the week.

I can ask and answer simple questions about personal information (e.g., first name, surname, age, nationality, phone number, email address, job).

I can say the alphabet in English to spell my first name and surname, to give my email address, and can ask someone how to spell a word.

I can say numbers in English to tell people my age or to give my phone number.

I can name common objects that I use every day, and ask what something is if I don’t know the word in English.

I can understand and follow basic commands to complete tasks in the classroom.

I can ask people to repeat information when they talk too quickly or when I don’t understand.

I can complete a simple form about my personal information.

I can ask for a drink on a plane/train.

I can ask and answer simple questions about typical activities I do.

I can name common jobs and give simple information about my job.

I can recognise different and vowel sounds.

I can talk about my family and ask other people simple questions about their family.

I can interact with a receptionist at a hotel and use simple language to check in, ask and answer basic questions.

I can write an informal email to a friend giving basic information about myself, my job, and my family.

I can use simple adjectives to describe myself, people I know, and things.

I can talk about my daily routine and the routines of people I know.

I can understand times and dates to follow plans, timetables, schedules, and to say when events start and finish; and I can ask for the time.

I can understand the main points of a simple article on the topic of daily routines and can use the context of the text to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can ask and answer simple questions about when and how often I do common activities.

I can say what the date is.

I can use simple language to order a coffee in a café and answer simple questions asked by the waiter.

I can write a simple magazine article about my favourite day and give details to explain why.

I can talk about my abilities to say things I can do and things I can’t; and I can ask other people what abilities they have.

I can notice sentence stress and how different words are emphasised by native speakers.

I can talk about things I like and things I don’t like; and I can ask simple questions about other people’s likes and dislikes.

I can understand some basic expressions used in love stories in movies or in books.

I can use some simple sentences to talk about music and my musical preferences.

I can name common types of clothes and I can ask and answer simple questions while shopping in a clothes store to ask for a different size, to find out the location of the changing rooms, and to ask how much the clothes cost.

I can write a description of a friend or relative, including details about their age, nationality, job, physical appearance, likes and dislikes.

I can say where and when I was born.

I can ask and answer questions about what happened in the past and use simple language to tell a story about what I did.

I can recognise the different pronunciation of verbs in the past simple and can try to use this pronunciation when I’m talking to make my English sound more natural.

I can talk simply about what I did in the past and ask what other people did in the past.

I can understand the main points of an extract taken from a murder mystery book.

I can ask how much things cost and answer simple questions while shopping in a gift shop.

I can write a short report about a holiday I had giving details about where I went, who I went with, and what I did.

I can give a basic description of my house, including the rooms and the furniture; and I can ask other people basic questions about their houses.

I can talk about the location of things using basic prepositions of place.

I can notice some English words contain silent letters and am aware that these letters are not pronounced.

I can talk about activities that happen regularly and activities that are happening now. I can describe what I am doing now and what I think other people are doing at the moment.

I can name typical places in a city and use basic sentences to give a short description of my city to tell other people about important tourist attractions and places to visit.

I can politely ask for directions, follow basic directions, and ask people to repeat the directions if I don’t understand them.

I can write a postcard giving simple details about my holiday.

I can say what food I eat and what I drink, and give simple details about the quantity of things.

I can understand a simple magazine article on the topic of water and use the context to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can understand the main points of a simple extract from a TV game show and follow two couple’s diary entries on the topic of holidays.

I can talk about my plans for the future and ask others about their plans.

I can talk about my predictions for the future.

I can read a simple menu in a restaurant and order a meal.

I can write simple instructions to make my favourite sandwich.

I can use simple language to compare two things, people, or places, and can identify the appropriate sentence stress in comparative adjectives.

I can use common adjectives to describe my personality and the personality of people I know.

I can compare three or more things, people, or places; and can ask and answer simple questions about my country using superlative adjectives.

I can say three things I would like to do.

I can understand short advertisements, and listen to a person talking on the topic of adventure presents.

I can talk about things I would like to do.

I can understand the main points of a short article where people talk about their experiences in a new country.

I can use adverbs to give more information about how people do things.

I can use simple language to check out of a hotel.

I can write a short email to a hotel to book a room. I can say what room I want, when I want to go, and can ask for some information.

I can talk about my life experiences, and ask other people about their life experiences.

I can ask and answer questions about books and films.

Pre Intermediate Syllabus - A2 - Learner Aims

I can ask and answer simple questions about myself.

I can talk about work and answer simple questions about my commute to work.

I can have a conversation about what I like to do in my free time and how often I do things.

I can understand the main points of a simple magazine article on the topic of free time activities; and can listen to and follow a short survey interview on this topic.

I can start and end conversations with people I don’t know.

I can describe past events and say when they happened.

I can talk about my relationships and other people’s relationships.

I can listen to, follow, and understand the main points of a simple story.

I can use the appropriate words to link sentences together to express reason and contrast.

I can ask and answer questions to find things in common with someone.

I can use common expressions to talk about my employment.

I can talk about people’s responsibilities and duties in their job by giving details about things they have to do.

I can use common phrases to talk about looking for a job.

I can say what people are doing now and what they usually do.

I can understand the main points of a simple radio interview and a short magazine article on the topic of employment and jobs.

I can apologise to people, give reasons, make promises, and respond appropriately when someone apologises to me.

I can talk about films, giving details about the type of film, the actors, the plot, and my opinion of it.

I can talk about my life experiences and give more details about when they happened, as well as ask other people questions about their life experiences.

I can talk about different types of music in general and give details about what type of music I like.

I can talk about common TV equipment and different types of TV programmes.

I can understand the main points of a simple online article on the topic of TV.

I can use basic adjectives to describe how people feel, and describe the thing, situation, place or person that causes that feeling.

I can ask for opinions and agree/disagree with people in a polite manner.

I can use common expressions to talk about the environment.

I can make predictions about life in the future and talk about things I think will happen and things that might happen.

I can ask and answer questions about my plans, hopes, and ambitions.

I can understand the main points of a radio interview and a magazine article on the topic of wildlife and conservation.

I can recognise the types of words that are stressed in natural spoken English.

I can engage in a conversation to organise an event by using common expressions to make and respond to offers, make suggestions and make requests.

I can use common positive and negative adjectives to describe my character and to describe other people’s character.

I can compare two or more people, places, or things.

I can talk about different types of relationships, such as family relationships, work relationships, and romantic relationships.

I can talk in detail about my family tree.

I can understand the main points of an article and listen to a radio drama to follow the storyline of a simple soap opera.

I can use common expressions on the phone to ask to speak to someone, leave a message, say where people can contact me, and to take a message.

I can talk about travel, journeys, trips and tours I have been on.

I can ask and answer questions about future arrangements.

I can talk about common things I take on holiday and give details about the quantity of these things.

I can understand the main points of a travel magazine article on the topic of unusual hotels.

I can make simple complaints and requests in a hotel, in a polite manner.

I can use simple language to describe my home.

I can say how long something has been happening.

I can talk about going to dinner and give details of my experience of going to a dinner party.

I can give advice about where to visit and give tips on how to behave in my country.

I can understand the main points in a magazine article and a radio interview on the topic of cultural differences.

I can ask for descriptions of people, places and things.

I can talk about common everyday problems.

I can talk about possible future events and give more information about what will happen if these situations are true.

I can talk about common positive and negative feelings.

I can talk about problems in my life and give other people simple advice about their problems.

I can understand the main points of a letter to a newspaper and a radio news report on the topic of problems in a neighbourhood.

I can talk about problems in my neighbourhood and things I’d like to do to improve my town/city.

I can invite people to dinner, for a drink etc.; accept and refuse an invitation politely; and arrange where and when to meet people.

I can talk about where things were made, grown, etc.

I can talk about how things are different now compared to the past.

I can talk about my childhood habits.

I can understand the main points of an article and listen to a simple profile of someone’s life.

I can understand and respond to common expressions used by sales assistants in a clothes shop, and can ask questions to get information about the price, the size, the location of the fitting rooms, and if it’s possible to return a product.

I can give news by giving details about things I’ve just/already done or haven’t done yet.

I can talk about some common crimes.

I can say which person, things, or place I am talking about.

I can understand the main points of radio news report and an online article on the topic of crime.

I can recognise different techniques I can use to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can show when I’m interested or surprised in a conversation.

I can use common expressions to talk about money.

I can report what other people have said to tell a story or to pass on information.

I can talk about imaginary situations in the present or future.

I can understand the main points of a simple online fact file and a radio interview on the topic of graffiti.

I can use connecting words to sequence the order of events when telling a story.

Intermediate Syllabus - B1 - Learner Aims

I can ask and answer questions about my likes and dislikes and free time activities.

I can express a variety of emotions and react to other people’s emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness).

I can listen to and follow the main points of an informal conversation between four people on the topic of free time activities and social clubs.

I can use the appropriate language to check information I think is correct and to check my understanding.

I can talk about work, and give details about rules in my workplace or school to describe things I am expected to do and things I have permission to do.

I can talk about food, foods I like and dislike, and different ways of cooking.

I can talk about events and activities that happen regularly/routinely and things that are happening now.

I can understand the main points of a newspaper article and a TV interview on the topic of sleep.

I can discuss problems, use the appropriate language/intonation to show concern, and give advice/suggestions to resolve the problem.

I can have a simple conversation about holidays and travel.

I can talk about my life experiences and recent events.

I can say and ask how long something has been happening, and how many things have been completed.

I can understand the main points of an online blog and a radio interview on the topic of volunteer holidays.

I can ask for, make, and respond to recommendations.

I can listen to a radio interview and am aware that native speakers link sounds together when they speak quickly.

I can talk about music and my favourite musical experiences.

I can tell stories about things that happened in the past, using the appropriate language to give background information, and to make the sequence of events clear.

I can describe people’s character and give reasons for my opinion.

I can use the context to guess the meaning of some words I don’t understand.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and a radio discussion on the topic of days out.

I can make generalisations and soften the way I express my opinion so that I don’t sound rude or offensive.

I can describe my home and talk about buildings, neighbourhoods, and some common household objects.

I can compare two or more people, things, or places.

I can talk about the future (my future plans, arrangements, intentions, and predictions).

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and listen to people telling personal stories on the topic of birthdays.

I can identify common fillers often used in spoken English (e.g., um, you know) and false starts (e.g., So it’s…I mean).

I can politely ask for things in a shop and explain what I need when I don’t know the word in English.

I can talk about things that are always true, and things that are possible in the future.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and an informal conversation on the topic of superstitions.

I can have a discussion in English by expressing my opinion, asking others for their opinion, and agreeing/disagreeing politely.

I can describe my goals, my achievements, and my ability in the past and now.

I can talk about computers, the internet, and social networking (e.g., Facebook, Twitter)

I can ask and answer questions about imaginary/hypothetical situations in the present and future, and express my opinion on how I would respond if these situations happened.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and follow an informal conversation on the topic of social networking.

I can notice that native speakers link words together and only stress important words in a sentence which gives English its natural rhythm.

I can ask questions and ask for information in a polite way.

I can talk about the weather and natural disasters and am better able to understand the language used in the weather forecast.

I can recognise and name different containers used for food in the kitchen and in the supermarket, and the quantity of things.

I can understand a newspaper article and a TV news report on the topic of dangers at sea.

I can give, ask for, and respond to warnings and advice.

I can talk about health and body movements.

I can say/define which person, place, time, or thing I’m talking about.

I can better understand the language used in a newspaper/news report.

I can use the appropriate connecting words to express contrast.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and a TV interview on the topic of human behaviour.

I can have a simple conversation about my medical problems, symptoms and treatment with a doctor.

I can talk about contacting people.

I can make excuses and explain why I didn’t do things I had planned to do or had agreed to do.

I can describe people’s clothes and physical appearance to identify or give details about other people.

I can make deductions about the present to express my opinion of what I believe is, isn’t or could be true.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and a radio interview on the topic of wedding traditions.

I can notice that native speakers link words together during fluent speech and can begin to try to produce this linking sounds when I speak.

I can ask other people for permission and I can respond appropriately to others when they ask my permission to do something by giving or refusing permission.

I can talk about things people do at work and use adjectives to describe jobs.

I can tell someone what another person said in order to tell a story, give information, or to pass on a message.

I can recognise that in informal spoken English it is normal to leave out some words if the meaning is clear.

I can understand the main points of a review of a TV programme and follow a simple storyline in a TV soap opera.

I can politely explain when I haven’t heard information correctly, ask someone to repeat information, and use appropriate language and intonation to check the information I have is correct.

I can use some common informal words and phrases, which are natural in everyday spoken English.

I can make wishes about imaginary situations in the present and future, and give reasons for the wishes.

I can talk about imaginary situations in the past to express regrets or to describe the opposite of what really happened.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article and a radio interview on the topic of superheroes.

Upper Intermediate Syllabus - B2 - Learner Aims

I can talk about what languages I speak and my ability in these languages.

I can recognise most of the tenses in the English verb system and have a basic understanding of how to use them.

I can use simple language to talk about education and university.

I can use the appropriate phrase to add emphasis, give a short answer to a yes/no question, avoid repeating a verb or phrase, and to show interest in other people.

I can recognise that in natural spoken English native speakers use contractions (e.g. I am = I’m) and try to use these when I speak.

I can recognise that in the natural rhythm of spoken English only words that give important information are stressed. I can focus on these words when listening to native speakers.

I can understand an article which expresses a specific point of view, and listen to stories on the topic of exams.

I can use the appropriate short questions to keep a conversation going effectively and to show interest in what someone else is saying.

I can talk about my habits now and my habits in the past; and say how often I do/did these things.

I can express my feelings and opinions about everyday situations.

I can talk about adapting to strange and difficult situations.

I can follow a conversation between colleagues and understand the main points of a book review about social science.

I can talk about common crimes and punishments.

I can talk in detail about imaginary situations in the present and future, and ask and answer simple questions about what I would do in these situations.

I can talk about imaginary situations in the past to express regrets and to talk about how my life would have been different if certain things hadn’t happened.

I can notice how weak forms and sentence stress gives English its natural rhythm and am aware of this when listening.

I can understand the main points of an online article and follow a radio interview on the topic of crime and punishment.

I can use some expressions to make, refuse and accept offers, and am aware of the appropriate intonation necessary to do this in a polite way.

I can tell a story or recount an event in detail, giving background information along with the sequence of events.

I can use some common words and phrases to talk about books and reading.

I can use common connecting words to give reasons and to express contrast.

I can understand the main points of a magazine article on the topic of practical jokes.

I can follow a spoken narrative and can use certain words phrases to predict what is coming next.

I can use informal expressions to exaggerate my feelings or the situation when telling a story.

I can respond appropriately when I’m surprised or not surprised by what someone tells me.

I can compare two or more people or things in different ways to express small/big differences and similarities.

I can talk in detail about different aspects of the future including my plans, arrangements, predictions and scheduled events.

I can guess the meaning of some words I don’t know by using the context of the text around them, and am better able to use this skill to read newspapers, books, notices.

I can recognise that some words sound the same but have different spellings and meanings.

I can understand the main points of a newspaper article and follow an interview on the topic of the nature of cities.

I can take part in a discussion, by using appropriate phrases to give my opinion, clarify my opinion, give myself time to think, and respond to other people’s ideas.

I can give tips and advice to people about social codes in my country.

I can describe positive and negative aspects of people’s character.

I can talk about future events that I’m certain will happen and future events that are possible, and express different levels of certainty.

I can understand back referencing in a text

I can notice that in spoken English words are linked together and are not pronounced separately.

I can understand a fashion article and follow live interviews on the topic of fashion.

I can politely ask for permission to interrupt people in the workplace and understand common expressions used to refuse permission.

I can express in detail how things in the past connect to the present.

I can understand common expressions associated with business and trade, and have a simple conversation about how things have changed in my country in recent times.

I can understand a text giving information about the history of the internet, and can follow conversations about using the internet.

I can recognise that in spoken English there are words and phrases I can ignore (e.g., um, you know, etc.) and that native speakers use these phrases to give themselves them to think about what they’re going to say next.

I can talk about using my phone and can use some common phrases to deal with problems while on the phone.

I can talk generally about my financial situation and dealing with money.

I can express wishes and hopes about the present and future.

I can express wishes and regrets about the past to talk about the opposite of what really happened.

I can understand a travel article and follow a conversation on the topic of tipping in different cultures.

I can recognise some differences between American and British accents.

I can apologise politely, give reasons for my actions, and respond appropriately to an apology.

I can talk about the cinema and express opinions on different forms of entertainment.

I can structure a sentence to focus on the result rather than on who did an action

I can talk about the quantity of things.

I can understand an article about an art exhibition and follow a discussion on art.

I can recognise that in spoken English we often leave out words when the meaning is clear.

I can ask a person if they are free, make a suggestion about what to do, say I have no preference about what to do, and politely refuse a suggestion.

I can understand the results of a quiz on the differences between men and women; and I can follow a discussion on the topic of gender roles in which the speakers don’t agree.

I can talk about household jobs and give details about whether I pay someone to do it, ask someone I know to do it, or do it myself.

I can use common adjectives to give my opinion on views and behaviours.

I can recognise techniques speakers use to contradict someone (e.g. sentence stress).

I can use some common phrases to introduce my opinion and to emphasise what I’m going to say next.

I can use common expressions to talk about work and business.

I can talk about arrangements in the future, something I will be doing in the future, and things that will be completed before a certain time in the future.

I can report what other people have said or asked in order to tell a story or to pass on a message/information.

I can follow a discussion where the speakers are trying to reach a decision.

I can put forward ideas, react positively or negatively to ideas, and summarise information in a group discussion.

I can recognise how a speaker pronouncing a word with extra stress can affect the meaning.

I can understand some colloquial words and phrases that are widely used in informal interactions.

I can make deductions about the present and past by using the appropriate language to say what I think is certainly true, possibly true, and certainly not true.

I can use vague expressions when I don’t know precise numbers, times, distances, etc.

I can talk about an imaginary past to express things that I imagine but didn’t happen in the past.

I can talk about general and specific ability in the past.

I can understand some common idioms.

Advanced - C1 - Learner Aims

I can talk in detail about work using common expressions and idioms.

I can speak in a well-structured manner by using appropriate discourse markers to link my ideas together to express a result, reason, purpose, or contrast.

I can understand the main points of a radio programme discussing the results of a survey on the topic of happiness in the workplace.

I can talk in detail about my family using a wide vocabulary, common expressions, and idioms.

I can have a debate about a familiar topic using common expressions to express agreement, half agreement, or disagreement; and can use the appropriate rhythm and intonation to express my opinions in a fluent manner.

I can understand the main points of an article and identify the author’s opinion on the topic of language.

I can use appropriate introductory phrases and sentence stress to emphasise that something is my own opinion.

I can understand complex language terminology.

I can better understand the sound-spelling relationship in English.

I can use the appropriate language to write a job application letter, which involves giving relevant personal information, talking about relevant experience and qualifications, and explaining suitability for the job.

I can understand the main points of an interview with a genealogist on the topic of family trees, and can better understand common expressions and idioms used.

I can understand extracts from a book and can understand speakers talking on the topic of childhood memories.

I can tell stories and talk about past events using the appropriate language to sequence the information correctly, and to give extra details.

I can understand the main points of an article on the topic of multi-tasking and can summarise these points to pass on the information to another person.

I can better use common formal and informal expressions to distance myself from information that may not be true, or to attribute opinions to somebody else.

I can understand the details of a radio phone-in show on the topic of time, and can summarise what I hear.

I can recognise that when people talk quickly, they usually link words together, and can better use this linking to make my English sound more natural.

I can better use expressions and idiomatic language relating to time.

I can understand the main points of stories on the topic of getting revenge and I can recognise the importance of using the context to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can better understand the many different ways the verb “get” can be used in English, as it is one of the most common verbs.

I can better write an engaging article for an online magazine by using techniques to get and keep the reader’s attention, and by using rich and precise vocabulary.

I can understand the main points of an interview on the topic of time and technology, and can recognise common expressions and idioms used.

I can talk in detail about sounds in general, and more specific verbs associated with the human voice to convey emotion (e.g., scream).

I can understand a radio broadcast on the topic of noise pollution.

I can speculate and make deductions in the past and in the present to talk about things I believe are/aren’t true, or things I believe could be true.

I can describe books, and ask and answer questions about my reading tastes.

I can understand and use inversion to add emphasis to what I’m saying and to make my message more dramatic.

I can identify some words in English that have ‘silent’ syllables and can understand that pronouncing these words correctly will make my speech more natural.

I can understand the main points of an article on the topic of translation and follow an interview with a professional translator.

I can talk in detail about money using common expressions and idioms.

I can understand the main points of an article on the topic of money, and can better use the context to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can talk about imaginary situations in the past, present and future to express my wishes, regrets, preferences

I can listen to and follow the details in a lecture on the connection between money and happiness.

I can write a review of a book using the appropriate language to express a reasonably sophisticated opinion, to describe what I am reviewing, and to summarise the plot.

I can understand the main points of an interview with a banker on the topic of women and money, and can better understand common expressions and idioms used.

I can understand more vocabulary on the topic of history and warfare.

I can identify the stressed syllable in word families which is important for my pronunciation.

I can understand the preface of a book and answer detailed questions on the topic of history in movies.

I can listen to a film critic talk about films and make notes to summarise the information.

I can understand, identify, and use appropriate discourse markers to link my ideas together when I write or speak.

I can understand and summarise the main points of extracts from a self-help book.

I can make polite requests by using common expressions and the appropriate intonation.

I can use a wide vocabulary to talk about using the phone.

I can use conditional sentences in the past, present, and future to talk about possible situations in the present/future, hypothetical situations in the present/future, and hypothetical situations in the past.

I can understand the main points of an article and listen to people’s opinions on the topic of modern addictions and obsessions.

I can write a discursive essay outlining a balanced argument and can better construct an argument, link points together in a logical sequence, and use appropriate discourse markers to connect, contrast, and balance points.

I can understand the main points of an interview with a screenwriter on the topic of movies.

I can understand the main points of an article on the topic of laws.

I can express permission, obligation, and necessity to talk about laws and customs.

I can recognise and use the appropriate intonation in common exclamations which is important for natural responses during conversation.

I can use the verbs of the senses to talk about things I can hear, see, feel, taste, or touch now, and to talk about the impression something or someone gives me through the senses.

I can understand and use extra stress on important words in a sentence to place emphasis on that word and to convey meaning.

I can follow a narrative in a short story.

I can use a wider vocabulary to talk about place and movement.

I can talk about health, medicine and alternative medicine using a wide variety of vocabulary and common similes.

I can listen to four people talking about their experiences of alternative medicine, and can understand the main points of a review of a new book on alternative medicine.

I can understand the main points of an interview with a painter on the topic of art and artists, and can better understand common expressions and idioms used in the interview.

I can understand the main points of an article from a guidebook series on the topic of travel.

I can talk in detail about travel and tourism using a wide range of vocabulary.

I can use a variety of phrases to express my preferences.

I can identify some common homophones (i.e., words that are spelled differently, but are pronounced exactly the same).

I can use a wide variety of structures to express future plans, predictions, and arrangements.

I can understand the main points of a radio programme on the topic of travel.

I can understand the main points of an article, and follow extracts from news broadcasts on the topic of animals, pets, and the natural world.

I can talk in detail and have a debate about animals and the natural world.

I can better understand and use ellipsis and substitution to make my speaking more natural and fluent.

I can use cleft sentences to focus attention on or emphasize one part of a sentence, and I can use the appropriate intonation.

I can understand the main points of an extract from a book on the topic of immigration, and can better use the context to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can better understand the difference between words that are often confused.

I can write a discursive essay which takes one side of an argument, by using techniques to construct an argument, sustain my case with examples, and show that I have considered the opposing viewpoint.

I can understand the main points of an interview with the vet on the topic of encounters with animals, and can better understand common expressions and idioms used.

I can talk in detail about food, ingredients, and ways of preparing food.

I can understand the main points of an extract from a book on the topic of food and can use the context to guess the meaning of words I don’t know.

I can use the appropriate suffixes to build verbs, nouns, and adjectives.

I can understand the main points of a newspaper article and an interview on the topic of sport.

I can identify and understand common homographs in English (i.e., words that are spelled the same but have different meanings), and can use the appropriate pronunciation.

I can better understand jokes and the language of humour.

I can use a wide variety of structures to make comparisons between two or more things fluently.

I can write a letter or email of complaint by using techniques to summarise the issue clearly, maintain an assertive but respectful tone, and use appropriately formal language.

I can understand the main points of an interview with a famous chef on the topic of cooking around the world, and can better understand common expressions and idioms used.

Cambridge Examinations PET – Preliminary English Test – B1 – Learner Aims

Students complete Unit 1

Grammar – Question forms and indirect questions

Vocabulary – Describing people and deducing words in context

Reading skills – Matching

Listening skills – Multiple choice

Speaking –  Personal questions: Identity

Writing – Informal letter and paragraphs

Students complete Unit 2 of assigned course book

Grammar – Present simple and continuous, and modals of possibility

Vocabulary – Collocations for food and suffixes

Reading skills – Four-option multiple choice

Listening skills – Multiple choice

Speaking –  Extended turn taking for general conversation

Writing – Story: using time linkers

Students complete Unit 3 of assigned course book

Grammar – -ing forms and infinitives, and modals of obligation

Vocabulary – Phrasal verbs and describing feelings

Reading skills – True/False for Mobile Manners

Listening skills – True/False for Making new Friends

Speaking –  Extended turn taking for general conversation: Disagreements

Writing – Message: using functional phrases

Students complete Unit 4 of assigned course

Grammar – Present perfect and past simple

Vocabulary – Linking words: addition and contrast. Town and City

Reading skills – Four-option multiple choice

Listening skills – Multiple choice: short recordings

Speaking –  Simulated situations: Personal objects

Writing – Sentence transformations

Students complete Unit 5 of assigned course book

Grammar – Comparatives and superlatives, too and enough, so and such

Vocabulary – verbs related to clothes, order of adjectives, house and home

Reading skills – Matching: Holiday home exchange

Listening skills – Gap-fill

Speaking –  Extended turn taking for general conversation: Swapping clothes

Writing – Message: following the task instructions

Students complete Unit 6 of assigned course book

Grammar – Past simple, past continuous, and past perfect simple

Vocabulary – Prepositional phrases and education

Reading skills – Four option multiple choice

Listening skills – True/False for Starting Out

Speaking –  Personal questions: Teaching new skills to young people

Writing – Story: Using narrative tenses

Students complete Unit 7 of assigned course book

Grammar – Countable and uncountable nouns, and articles

Vocabulary – Adjectives and prepositions, and weather

Reading skills – True/False for New Forest Health Spa

Listening skills – Multiple choice: Top Cruises with Ocean Star

Speaking –  Simulated situation: Extreme Races

Writing – Informal letter and editing your work

Students complete Unit 8 of assigned course book

Grammar – Reported speech and reported questions

Vocabulary – Entertainment, and -ed and -ing adjectives

Reading skills – Four option multiple choice

Listening skills – Gap-fill: The New York Reality TV School

Speaking –  Extended turn taking for general conversation: Entertainment

Writing – Story: structuring your paragraphs

Students complete Unit 9 of assigned course book

Grammar – Modals of ability and relative clauses

Vocabulary – Formal language, job skills, and prefixes

Reading skills – Matching: Photography courses

Listening skills – Multiple choice: The power of gaming

Speaking –  Extended turns: Lee Hadwin’s Art

Writing – Sentence transformation and checking your spelling

Students complete Unit 10 of assigned course book

Grammar – Passive voice, get/have something done

Vocabulary – Shops and services, verbs and prepositions

Reading skills – Three option multiple choice: The Sales

Listening skills – Gap-fill: Charity Auction Evening

Speaking –  Simulated situation: Gifts

Writing – Notes, joining sentences with linkers

Students complete Unit 11 of assigned course book

Grammar – Future forms and will and going to

Vocabulary – compound adjectives and travel and transport

Reading skills – Four option multiple choice

Listening skills – Multiple choice: Short recordings

Speaking –  Extended turn and General conversation: People and animals

Writing – Informal letter and Using informal linkers

Students complete Unit 12 of assigned course book

Grammar – Zero and first and second conditionals

Vocabulary – Confusing words and sport and leisure

Reading skills – Three option multiple choice: Danger

Listening skills – True/False: We’re all good at something

Speaking –  Simulated situation: Travelling in New Zealand

Writing – Sentence transformations: Keeping the meanings the same

Cambridge English : First –B2 - Learner Aims

Students complete Unit 1 of assigned course book for FCE preparation

Grammar– Revision of simple tenses

Vocabulary – Word formation

Developing reading skills – multiple matching

Writing skills – informal emails

Developing listening skills –  from FCE Listening paper

Exam focus –Speaking – Introductions

Students complete Unit 2 of assigned course book

Grammar – defining and non-defining clauses

Vocabulary – Compound adjectives / Negative prefixes

Reading – Multiple choice questions from CAE reading paper

Writing skills – Semi formal letter or email

Developing listening skills

Exam focus – Speaking –Risk taking in discussions

Students complete Unit 3 of assigned course book

Grammar – Narrative tenses

Vocabulary – Modifiers/ Intensifiers

Reading – Multiple choice questions from FCE reading paper

Writing skills – story sequencing

Developing listening skills for FCE exam – multiple matching

Exam focus – Speaking – expressing opinions

Students complete Unit 4 of assigned course

Grammar – Countable and uncountable nouns

Vocabulary – Food/prepositions

Reading – Multiple choice questions from CAE reading paper

Writing skills – Articles

Developing listening – Sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking – Discussing advantages and disadvantages

Students complete Unit 5 of assigned course book

Grammar – Indirect speech / reporting verbs

Vocabulary – describing objects

Reading – Multiple choice questions

Writing skills – A Review

Developing listening – Exam focus – Listening to Radio adverts- multiple choice for listening paper

Exam focus –Speaking – Discussion and expressing uncertainty

Students complete Unit 6 of assigned course book

Grammar – Certainty and possibility

Vocabulary – Technology and communications

Reading – Gapped text reading  – Exam focus

Writing skills – A Report

Developing listening – Songs and music

Exam focus – Speaking –Long turn taking in speaking exam

Students complete Unit 7 of assigned course book

Grammar – Relative clauses / conditionals

Vocabulary – General nouns

Reading – Multiple matching task – Exam focus

Writing skills – An Essay

Developing listening – Exam focus – Sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking –Ranking discussion

Students complete Unit 8 of assigned course book

Grammar – Gerunds and Infinitives

Reading – Word formation – suffixes

Writing skills – Writing an Article

Developing listening skills – sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking – Adding ideas

Students complete Unit 9 of assigned course book

Grammar – Present and Past habit

Developing reading skills – Gapped texts / word formation for FCE

Writing skills – Writing a Report

Developing listening skills – Exam focus multiple choice questions

Exam focus – Speaking – Individual long turn – stressing key information

Students complete Unit 10 of assigned course book

Grammar – Obligation , Necessity and Permission

Vocabulary – expressions with “Mind”

Developing reading – multiple choice questions for FCE

Writing skills – Writing an Article

Developing listening skills – Exam focus – Sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking – Collaborate task / discussion

Students complete Unit 11 of assigned course book

Grammar – Ability and Possibility / Conditionals

Developing reading skills – Multiple matching texts for FCE

Writing skills – Letter of Application

Vocabulary – employment /Money and Numbers

Developing listening skills – Exam focus-  multiple matching questions

Exam focus – Speaking – A complete test

Students complete Unit 12 of assigned course book

Grammar – Passives

Vocabulary – Crime and Punishment

Developing reading skills – Gapped texts for FCE

Writing skills – Writing a Story

Developing listening skills –Sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking – Developing discussion skills

Practice Examinations

Cambridge English : Advanced –C1 –Learner Aims

Students complete Unit 1 of assigned course book for CAE preparation

Grammar overview

Vocabulary review e.g. suffixes

Developing reading skills for CAE texts

Writing skills drafting and organising paragraphs

Developing listening skills – multiple choice questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus –Speaking – Conversational skills

Students complete Unit 2 of assigned course book

Grammar – defining and non-defining clauses

Vocabulary – Compound adjectives

Reading – Multiple choice questions from CAE reading paper

Writing skills – Informal letter

Developing listening skills e.g. listening to a radio programme

Exam focus – Speaking – Giving opinions

Students complete Unit 3 of assigned course book

Grammar – Modal verbs – gerunds and infinitives

Vocabulary – Adjectives of character

Reading – Multiple choice questions from CAE reading paper

Writing skills – Information sheet

Developing listening skills for CAE exam

Exam focus – Speaking – language of possibility and speculation

Students complete Unit 4 of assigned course book .

Grammar – Conditionals overview

Vocabulary – Word formation – Collocations

Reading – Gapped text from CAE reading paper

Writing skills – Articles

Developing listening – Exam focus Multiple choice for listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking

Students complete Unit 5 of assigned course book

Grammar – Intensifiers/Modifiers

Vocabulary – Word formation / Sports Idioms

Reading – Multiple matching – Exam focus

Writing skills – A reference

Developing listening – Exam focus Multiple choice for listening paper

Exam focus – Agreeing and disagreeing

Students complete Unit 6 of assigned course book

Grammar – Hypothetical meaning with wish / work transformations

Vocabulary – Word+prepositions

Reading – Multiple choice reading  – Exam focus

Writing skills – A Reference

Developing listening – Exam focus  for listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – Collaborative task / discussion

Students complete Unit 7 of assigned course book

Grammar – Future Forms

Vocabulary – Phrasal verbs

Reading – Multiple choice task – Exam focus

Writing skills – A Review

Developing listening – Exam focus – Sentence completion

Exam focus – Speaking – 2 way conversation tasks

Students complete Unit 8 of assigned course book

Grammar – Direct and reported speech/ phrasal verbs

Reading – Exam focus gapped text

Writing skills – Writing a proposal

Developing listening skills – multiple choice questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – Comparing

Students complete Unit 9 of assigned course book

Grammar – Review of Narrative tenses / Adjectives and nouns

Developing reading skills – Multiple matching texts for CAE

Writing skills – Form completing

Developing listening skills – multiple choice questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – Individual long turn

Students complete Unit 10 of assigned course book

Grammar – Countable and Uncountable nouns

Vocabulary review Phrasal verbs and compound nouns

Developing reading skills – Gapped text for CAE exam

Writing skills – Report writing

Developing listening skills – multiple choice questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – Sounding Interesting

Students complete Unit 11 of assigned course book

Grammar – Modal verbs / phrasal verbs and expressions with take

Developing reading skills for CAE texts – exam focus multiple focus

Writing skills – An article

Developing listening skills –questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – Individual long turn

Students complete Unit 12 of assigned course book

Grammar – Passives/The future in the past/ work formation

Vocabulary review – Idiomatic language

Developing reading skills for CAE texts

Writing skills – writing an essay

Developing listening skills – multiple choice questions from CAE Listening paper

Exam focus – Speaking – 2 way conversation

Practice Examinations

Cambridge English: Proficiency – C2 – Learner Aims

Students complete Unit 1and 2 of assigned course book

Topics–Talking about change / Expectations

Grammar – Perfect tenses / Aspects of the future

Vocabulary – Introduction to Idioms / Noun endings

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Homophones

Students complete Unit 3and 4 of assigned course book

Topics – Human behaviour / Food and rituals

Grammar –Conditional forms/ Past tenses

Vocabulary – Collocations / Idioms

Exam skills

Students complete Unit 5 and 6 of assigned course book

Topics – Advertising / Music

Grammar – Countable and Uncountable nouns / Degrees of likelihood

Vocabulary – Phrases with take / Abstract nouns

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Contrastive stress

Students complete Unit 7and 8 of assigned course book

Topics – Art and sight / City living

Grammar – Inversion / Principle clauses

Vocabulary – Idioms with eye / Compound adjectives

Exam skills

Students complete Unit 9 and 10 of assigned course book

Topics – Attitudes / Language and Culture

Grammar – Past verb forms / Gerunds and Infinitives

Vocabulary – Idioms with come / Expressions with turn

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Word stress

Students complete Unit 11 and 12

Topics – Science / Relationships

Grammar – Adjectives / Passive structures

Vocabulary – Idioms with set/ idioms to do with relationships

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Stress and emphasis

Students complete Unit 13 and 14 Week 7

Topics – The Environment / Sport and Health

Grammar – Reported speech / Articles

Vocabulary – Register /Expressions with live

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Noun / verb / adjective stress

Students complete Unit 15 and 16

Topics – The world of work / Literature and the printed word

Grammar – Purpose and reason clauses / Concessive clauses

Vocabulary – Adjectives describing character

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Silent consonants

Students complete Unit 17 and 18

Topics – Happiness / Freedom

Grammar – Comparison / Review of Modal verbs

Vocabulary – Word formation

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Stress and emphasis

Students complete Unit 19 of assigned course book Topic – Strange places

Grammar – Word order and adjectives

Vocabulary – Word formation

Exam skills

Topics – Humour

Grammar – Grammar review

Vocabulary – Phrasal verbs with go

Exam skills

Pronunciation – Foreign words

Students complete revision Units 1 to 20

Practice Examinations

IELTS –Learner Aims – B1+

Students complete Unit 1and 2 of assigned course book

Topics– Studying and Sport

Grammar – Modality/ Perfect tenses

Vocabulary – Compound nouns / Intensifying Adverbs

Task type – Multiple choice / reading quickly

Pronunciation – Numbers and Letters

Students complete Unit 3 and 4

Topic – Marketing and Communication

Grammar – Cleft sentences/ Adverbial clauses

Vocabulary – Word building / Language terms

Task type – Locating information / Multiple choice matching

Pronunciation – Vowels

Students complete Unit 5 and 6

Topics – Products and Music

Grammar – Passive Forms/ Concessive clauses

Vocabulary – Collocations relating to waste / Word building

Task type – Sentence Completion / Classification

Pronunciation – Lists

Students complete Unit 7and 8

Topic –Exploration and Food technology

Grammar – Modals in conditional sentences

Vocabulary – Personal qualities / Phrasal verbs with up

Task type – Flow chart completion /Labelling a diagram

Pronunciation – /a/

Students complete Unit 9 and 10

Topics – Cities and Dreams

Grammar – Modal verbs of Speculation / Inversion

Vocabulary – Word building / Collocations in Academic writing

Task type – Multiple choice / Summary completion

Pronunciation – Vowel changes in related words

Students complete Unit 11 and 12

Topics – The Earth and Genetics

Grammar – Non-finite clauses / Infinitives

Vocabulary – Phrasal verbs with on / Geographical terms

Task type – Labelling maps / Short answer questions

Students complete Unit 13 and 14

Topics – Space and Social Change

Grammar – The Future / Pronouns

Vocabulary – Cause and result / Adjective – noun collocations

Task type – Sentence completion / Classification

Pronunciation – Word stress – Adverbs

Students complete Unit 15 and 16

Topics – Psychology and Interpreting the World

Grammar – Verb patterns

Vocabulary – Adjectives / Abstract nouns

Task type – Note completion / Headings

Pronunciation – Intonation

Students complete Unit 17 and 18

Topics – Migration / Literature and Translation

Grammar – Relative clauses / Verbs followed by wh clauses

Vocabulary – Idioms and metaphors

Task type – Multiple choice / Note completion

Students complete Unit 19

Topic – Work

Grammar – Noun phrases

Vocabulary – Running a business

Task type – Summary completion / Table completion

Pronunciation – Sounding Interesting

Students complete Unit 20

Topic – History

Grammar – Modal perfects

Vocabulary –Word building / Deducing meaning from words

Task type – Global multiple choice / Note completion

Pronunciation – The long pronunciation of vowels

Students complete revision Units 1 to 20

Practice Examinations